Molly Samuel | WABE 90.1 FM

Molly Samuel

Reporter

Molly Samuel joined WABE as a reporter in November 2014. Before coming on board, she was a science producer and reporter at KQED in San Francisco, where she won awards for her reporting on hydropower and on crude oil.

Molly was a fellow with the Middlebury Fellowships in Environmental Journalism and a journalist-in-residence at the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center.

She’s from Atlanta, has a degree in Ancient Greek from Oberlin College and is a co-founder of the record label True Panther Sounds.

Evan Jang / WABE

People experiencing food insecurity – not knowing where their next meal will come from – mostly live around downtown Atlanta and south of I-20.

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But that's changing. A new analysis finds that food insecurity will increase more quickly in the suburbs to the east and west as numbers decrease in-town.

ENERGY.GOV via wikimedia

Researchers are starting an environmental monitoring program in the Georgia community of Shell Bluff. 

The community is south of Augusta on the Savannah River, near a nuclear power plant and a federal nuclear facility. Some residents are worried about the potential for contamination.

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Alison Guillory / WABE

Atlanta's air is getting cleaner. Earlier this month, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency made it official: The metro area is now in compliance with federal standards on ozone, which contributes to smog.

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That's good news for people's health, but the pollution rules could be stricter. The Trump Administration recently delayed fully implementing a lower ozone standard. Still, officials here say it’s a big deal that Atlanta is meeting federal ozone rules.

John Bazemore / Associated Press file

Toshiba has guaranteed more than $3 billion related to construction costs at Georgia Power’s Plant Vogtle. The future of the nuclear expansion at the power plant, which is near Augusta, has been – and still is – up in the air since the Toshiba subsidiary Westinghouse declared bankruptcy earlier this year.

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Ian Palmer / WABE

Delta Air Lines and Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport are joining an initiative to support conservation projects on the Flint River, which starts just north of the airport—then flows under it.  

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The Flint supplies water to Georgia cities and farms, then to Florida’s Apalachicola Bay. The water can get pretty low, according to Ben Emanuel of the conservation group American Rivers. 

John Bazemore / Associated Press file

A state regulator wants Georgia Power to stop charging its customers for a nuclear power expansion project. But the idea is on hold for now.

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Georgia Power is analyzing the future of its two new nuclear power units at Plant Vogtle, since the lead contractor declared bankruptcy earlier this year.

Stephan Savoia, File / Associated Press

Federal officials are considering the impacts on wildlife from looking for oil and natural gas in the Atlantic Ocean, including off Georgia’s coast. And they’re asking for public comment on the plan for the next 30 days.

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David Goldman / associated press file

A state utility regulator wants to ask Georgia Power to stop charging customers for its nuclear power plant expansion. It’s an idea that probably won’t go far, but comes as Georgia Power considers the future of the project.  

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J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

While the United States is pulling out of the Paris climate accord, dozens of cities, including Atlanta, say they're committed to it.

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Molly Samuel / WABE

Sorry about the rained out Memorial Day barbecues earlier this week, but there's some good news related to the rain.

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Most metro Atlanta counties are not experiencing any drought conditions at this point, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor.

There are big things happening on the west side of Atlanta right now. The city is creating large parks and a trail that will connect to the BeltLine, all part of the long-term cleanup of Proctor Creek.

Alison Guillory / WABE

Neighborhoods on Atlanta’s Westside are changing. Mercedes-Benz Stadium construction is wrapping up; the BeltLine is coming. And what has been a blighted creek could eventually become an amenity. But some residents are concerned that efforts to fix Proctor Creek could eventually price them out.

Alison Guillory / WABE

Proctor Creek flows from downtown Atlanta across dozens of neighborhoods to the Chattahoochee River. There has been ongoing work to address flooding and pollution the creek

There is also a new project aimed at connection people to the creek — and to each other. 

Alison Guillory / WABE

Proctor Creek has been a problem for residents of 35 northwest Atlanta neighborhoods for a long time. It’s polluted. It floods.

That’s changing, though. 

Billions of dollars' worth of upgrades to the city's sewer system and plans for a series of parks address the long-running issues with the creek. 

Alison Guillory / WABE

Some of the rain that falls in downtown Atlanta eventually forms Proctor Creek, which flows through the west side of the city and into the Chattahoochee River. Like the rest of Atlanta's creeks, Proctor Creek is polluted. But it still has wildlife living in it. Scientists are learning more about the health of the creek and its critters by studying crayfish.  

  A longer version of this story was published and aired last fall. 

Alison Guillory / WABE

Proctor Creek flows out of downtown Atlanta through the west side of the city. There have long been problems with the health of the creek, especially flooding and pollution. 

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That can lead to health problems for the people who live near the creek, which flows through 35 Atlanta neighborhoods on its way to the Chattahoochee River.

Alison Guillory / WABE

There’s a polluted waterway that runs from downtown Atlanta to the Chattahoochee River. It’s called Proctor Creek.

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For decades, it’s caused problems for people who live near it.  Now, there’s a lot more attention on the future of the creek, and neighborhoods on the Westside.

This is part of a continuing series about Proctor Creek that airs on "Morning Edition" with WABE host Denis O'Hayer.

Conceptual rendering by HDR, Inc. courtesy of The Trust for Public Land

Atlanta broke ground Friday on a big new park, just west of downtown. Cook Park, in Vine City, will have statues honoring Civil Rights leaders. It’s also being built to alleviate flooding on the Westside.

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Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed said the park will be a new Atlanta landmark.

Alison Guillory / WABE

Friday afternoon, there's a groundbreaking for a new park on Atlanta’s Westside. Cook Park will honor civil rights leaders. It will also help with long-term flooding and pollution in the area.

John Bazemore, File / Associated Press

Friday is a key deadline for Georgia Power. The company worked out a deal to keep construction going on its two new nuclear power units at Plant Vogtle near Augusta. That's as Westinghouse, which is the lead contractor, has begun bankruptcy proceedings. That deal was extended at the end of April, and now expires Friday night.

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Alex Sanz / Associated Press

Former President Jimmy Carter says he's in good health -- and writing a new book. On Tuesday, he told participants at a conference on human rights that he plans to include their work and thoughts in the book.

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“I'm not going to concentrate on hope,” he said. “I'm certainly not going to concentrate on despair. I'm not going to concentrate on anything except, I'm going to use the word, faith.”

Mary Claire Kelly / WABE

The debate is back about offshore oil exploration and drilling in the Atlantic Ocean, including the Georgia coastal area. President Donald Trump signed an executive order Friday directing the Department of the Interior to look at opening up more areas to offshore drilling.

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Karen Clarke / Trust for Public Land

The Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area has expanded by bits and pieces since it was created in the 1970s. The park's property adds up to about 7,000 acres in patches along nearly 50 miles of the Chattahoochee River, from Lake Lanier down to the city of Atlanta.

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Courtesy of AMB Group

Once Mercedes-Benz Stadium is finished, the Georgia Dome will be torn down and will be replaced by a park. The 13-acre space will be for tailgating on game days and open to the public when the new stadium is not in use.

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Steven Senne / Associated Press

March for Science organizers in Atlanta are preparing for thousands of people to turn out this Saturday in a movement that’s coalesced since President Donald Trump’s inauguration.

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The main march is in Washington, D.C., but like the Women’s March in January, satellite events are happening all over the country. Here, people are gathering in Candler Park to hear speakers, to march, and to express their support for what they say should be a non-partisan issue: science.

Courtesy of Tybee Island Police Department

The sea level is already rising on American coasts. In Georgia, the sea level has gone up more than nine inches in the last 75 years. Globally, it could go up another one to four feet in the next 75 years.

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Some places and people will be able to adapt to rising tides. But a lot of people in the United States will have to move, and many could end up in Atlanta, according to a new study.

Tasnim Shamma / WABE File

The Atlanta Braves play their first regular season game in their new home at SunTrust Park on Friday. Meanwhile, a group of protesters has taken up residence in tents outside the Braves' old home at Turner Field.

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Ali Guillory / WABE

Residents of the brand new city of South Fulton are choosing their first mayor and City Council.

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Early voting in the runoff election is this week, and election day is Tuesday.

Molly Samuel / WABE

The amount of water flowing down the Chattahoochee River from Georgia into Florida is being reduced. Though it’s been a very rainy week here, the drought is still dragging on, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is beginning drought operations on the river basin.

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Molly Samuel / WABE

A controversial plan to bring tens of thousands of tons of coal ash to a landfill in South Georgia is off the table.

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