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Music

Roger Mastroianni

Since the presidency of Franklin D. Roosevelt, Americans have used the expression "the first 100 days" as a benchmark of the executive's success and accomplishments. The first 100 days are, supposedly, the time that a president's power and influence is at its greatest.

Payton Haynes / Flyingmango.org

The Atlanta music scene is diverse and that's demonstrated handily by Immersive Atlanta's look ahead at the albums by local artists coming out this month. The list includes soul, death metal and much in between.

Myke Johns sits down with Guillermo Castro, editor of Immersive Atlanta for a listen-ahead.

Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP, File

On stage, Prince was still captivating audiences at recent performances in Australia and California. He hosted a pop-up party at his Paisley Park studio, and there were few outward signs in his final months that anything was wrong.

But off stage, something was different. Prince began wanting meals that were easier to digest and was fighting off waves of sore throats and frequent upset stomachs, the musician's personal chef told The Associated Press.

Al Such / WABE

This story is part of WABE, Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and ArtsATL’s The Shaw 100th series. For more stories, click here.

What distinguishes the "Shaw Sound?" What makes the late conductor's choral recordings so peerless, so unsurpassed?

Frank Micelotta/Invision for Parkwood Entertainment/AP Images

Just a week after nearly breaking the internet with her new album "Lemonade," Beyoncé will be performing in Atlanta this weekend.

Contributor Mara Davis joins host emeritus Steve Goss for a look at that show and many more in "Mara's Music Mix."

Phil Ramey / Associated Press

Paste Magazine, based in Decatur, has launched "The Archive", a new podcast which features historic music performances and audio interviews from the past few decades.

Among the artists that will be featured: John Lennon, Keith Richards, James Brown and Tina Turner.

John Lorinc sat down with Paste Magazine's editor-in-chief and host of "The Archive," Josh Jackson, to talk about the new program.

Matt Sayles / Invision/AP File

Updated at 1:15 p.m. Thursday

Prescription drugs were discovered with Prince when he was found dead in his Paisley Park home in suburban Minneapolis, several news organizations reported.

ABC, NBC, CBS, and CNN, citing unidentified law enforcement sources, reported that prescription painkillers were found on the 57-year-old musician and in his home. The Star Tribune, also citing unnamed sources, reported that prescription pills were found but that it wasn't clear whether they had been prescribed to Prince.

Steve Karnowski / Associated Press

A Minnesota judge appointed a trust company to temporarily oversee Prince's multi-million dollar estate on Wednesday.

Bremer Trust was named special administrator of Prince's estate after an informal telephone conference with some of the musician's potential heirs and a judge.

This story is part of WABE, Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and ArtsATL’s The Shaw 100th series. For more stories, click here.

Not everyone gets to put "worked with a legend" on their resume. Conductor and Georgia State professor Michael Palmer is one of the fortunate few.

PeterTea / www.flickr.com/petertea (cropped)

Prince's sister says the superstar musician had no known will and filed paperwork Tuesday asking a Minneapolis court appoint a special administrator to oversee his estate.

Tyka Nelson, Prince's only surviving full sibling, said in the court filing that immediate action was necessary to manage Prince's business interests following his death last week. The size of Prince's fortune is unclear, though he made hundreds of millions of dollars for record companies, concert venues and others during his career and his estate included about $27 million in property.

Stephen Chernin / Associated Press

It's only April and already 2016 is a terrible year for music.

That's not to slight Kendrick Lamar, Sturgill Simpson, Beyonce or some unknown creator working in a basement to turn the sounds in their head into a file for everyone to hear and enjoy.

But any year that silences the voices behind "Sign o' the Times," ''Space Oddity," ''Tequila Sunrise," ''Shining Star" and "The Bottle Let Me Down" can't qualify as anything other than awful.

Ron Harris / Associated Press

April 20, or "4/20," was this Wednesday ... and it continues through this weekend. The Sweetwater 420 Fest takes over Centennial Olympic Park and there is so much more happening in Atlanta music this week.

Contributor Mara Davis joined host emeritus Steve Goss for a look at upcoming shows for Mara's Music Mix.

Liu Heung Shing / Associated Press

A small group of fans has gathered in the rain on a hillside opposite Prince's home and studios at Paisley Park, some taking photos with their cellphones.

The music superstar's publicist tells the AP that Prince died at his home Thursday at the age of 57.

Thirty-two-year-old Steven Scott of Eden Prairie said he was at Paisley Park last Saturday for Prince's dance party. He called Prince "a beautiful person" whose message was that people should love one another.

Chris O'Meara / Associated Press

Pop superstar Prince, who was widely acclaimed as one of the most inventive musicians of his era with hits including "Little Red Corvette," ''Let's Go Crazy" and "When Doves Cry," was found dead at his home on Thursday in suburban Minneapolis, according to his publicist.

Sheriff's officials in Minnesota say deputies found Prince unresponsive in an elevator after they were summoned to his suburban Minneapolis compound.

Courtesy of Nola Frink

This story is part of WABE, Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and ArtsATL’s The Shaw 100th series. For more stories, click here.

"There's a terrible job available at the Symphony. Come take it and don't ask any questions."

The terrible job was receptionist for the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, and Nola Frink took it without question. A few short weeks later, Frink became Robert Shaw's personal assistant, a position she held for 26 years.

Ariana Cubillos / Associated Press

This story is part of WABE, Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and ArtsATL’s The Shaw 100th series. For more stories, click here.

The late Atlanta Symphony Orchestra conductor Robert Shaw had the ability to spot talent, even if that talent was fresh out of school.

Exit Festival (cropped) creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/legalcode / flickr.com/photos/exitfestival/

This weekend, Atlanta is playing host to Duran Duran, Bryan Adams and rapper Rakim. No, we haven't been transported back to the 1980s; it's just "Mara's Music Mix"!

Contributor Mara Davis joins host emeritus Steve Goss for a look at acts both old and new making their way through Atlanta.

Jeff Roffman / Atlanta Symphony Orchestra

This story is part of WABE, Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and ArtsATL’s The Shaw 100th series. For more stories, click here.

More than any other musician, Maestro Norman Mackenzie is the most direct connection to Robert Shaw.

Cheryl Bray / Courtesy of ArtsATL

This story is part of WABE, Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and ArtsATL’s The Shaw 100th series. For more stories, click here.

Robert Shaw was a natural, if unlikely musician who stumbled into an art form and revolutionized it. He was a self-proclaimed zealot who could never settle for less than perfection and, once he arrived in Atlanta in 1967, he molded the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and Chorus into world-class ensembles.

Devon Christopher Adams (cropped) creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/legalcode / flickr.com/photos/nooccar/

This weekend, Atlanta is playing host to folk rock giants, indie rock darlings and the Particle Men themselves on what might be their final tour.

Contributor Mara Davis joined host emeritus Steve Goss for a look at upcoming concerts.

Georgia State University

This story is part of WABE, Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and ArtsATL’s The Shaw 100th series. For more stories, click here.

Job interviews are often awkward at their best, and disastrous at their worst. For Georgia State professor John Haberlen, one particular interview profoundly influenced his own life and career.

PeterTea / www.flickr.com/petertea (cropped)

Musician Prince has canceled two performances at the Fox Theatre on Thursday due to illness.

According to a statement by the theater, the artist is currently battling the flu.

The performances, scheduled for 7 p.m. and 10 p.m., will both be postponed until a later date, with refunds available. His concerts were set to include both his classic hits and tracks from his latest album "HITnRun Phase II."

The rescheduled dates have not yet been announced.

Robb D. Cohen / Invision/AP

Country giant Merle Haggard, who rose from poverty and prison to international fame though his songs about outlaws, underdogs and an abiding sense of national pride in such hits as "Okie From Muskogee" and "Sing Me Back Home," died Wednesday at 79, on his birthday.

Haggard's manager, Frank Mull, said the country icon died in Palo Cedro, California, 8 miles east of Redding, of pneumonia that he had been battling for months. He had kept up an ambitious touring schedule, but the pneumonia in both lungs had forced him to cancel several shows this year.

Joel Ryan / Invision/AP, File

Janet Jackson is delaying her "Unbreakable" tour, saying Wednesday that she and her husband are planning their family and that she is under doctor's orders to rest.

The 49-year-old singer announced in a clip on her Twitter account Wednesday morning that there has been a "sudden change" to the second leg of her tour, which started in August.

She didn't say she was pregnant with her first child, only that she needed to rest up. The youngest child of the Jackson family, she turns 50 in May.

Jason Aldean beat Luke Bryan and Miranda Lambert for entertainer of the year at the Academy of Country Music Awards — a first for the singer after earning nominations for the top prize over the years, while Chris Stapleton cleaned house in other categories.

Aldean also won over Garth Brooks and Eric Church on Sunday at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas.

"I was just starting to think this one wasn't in the cards for me," Aldean said onstage near the end of the three-hour show, which aired on CBS. "This is one of the best nights of my professional career."

Matt Odom

With April Fool's Day out of the way and spring settling over Atlanta, producer Myke Johns sits down with Guillermo Castro, editor of Immersive Atlanta, for a look ahead at some of the new music coming out of the city's musicians:

wfuv (cropped) creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/legalcode / flickr.com/photos/wfuv/

Atlanta is playing host to Dr. Dog, G. Love and a former Go-Go this coming weekend. Contributor Mara Davis joined host emeritus Steve Goss to preview some of metro Atlanta's upcoming concerts with Mara's Music Mix.

Myke Johns / WABE

How do you turn a dream into a song? You can ask local Atlanta band Book of Colors.

For WABE and Immersive Atlanta's series Liner Notes, songwriter Andre Paraguassu assembled his string section for a performance and sat down to talk about their song "Lucid Dream."

In the dream, Paraguassu described being in field full of everyone he knows. "I just felt so much love and was so happy," he said, "I breathed in and the moment I did, I lifted off the ground."

Courtesy of Voices of Note

This story is part of WABE, Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and ArtsATL’s The Shaw 100th series. For more stories, click here.

One need not look far in Atlanta's choral music scene to find the influence of conductor Robert Shaw. He was the Atlanta Symphony's music director from the late 1960s to the late 80s and is credited with putting the city's classical scene on the map.

Joe Holloway Jr / Associated Press

This story is part of WABE, Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and ArtsATL’s The Shaw 100th series. For more stories, click here.

One man, perhaps more than any other, is credited with putting Atlanta classical music on the map, and that is Robert Shaw. He directed the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra for over two decades.

In the month leading up to what would have been his 100th birthday, we're going to be celebrating Shaw and his contributions to Atlanta, to classical music and to the lives of those he worked with over the years.

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