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Medicaid

Elly YU / WABE

Some of the state's top Republican leaders said they have concerns about the Republican health care bill moving through Congress, and in particular a funding plan for Medicaid.

Under the Congressional Republican plan, states after 2020 would get a capped amount of federal funding based on how much a state spends per person on Medicaid. The Medicaid program insures low-income people and those with disabilities.

J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

 

 

U.S. House Republicans have unveiled a pair of bills laying out what repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act could look like.

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According to Cindy Zeldin, with healthcare consumer advocacy group Georgians for a Healthy Future, one of the biggest impacts this state would feel is from a major shift in the way Medicaid works.

Elly Yu / WABE News

Cindy Jones still can’t help but think about the timing of things. Stewart-Webster Hospital, the place she and her family had gone to for years, closed in March of 2013. A month later, her husband Bill suffered a heart attack.

“He came in from a day of farming and ate supper, and then sat down to watch David Letterman,” Jones said. “And all of a sudden he got quiet, and we knew something was wrong because he wasn’t laughing at David Letterman anymore.”

A Pennsylvania lottery kiosk promotes the record $1.4 billion Powerball Jackpot in a mini-mart in Monroeville, Pa., Jan. 11, 2015.
Gene J. Puskar / Associated Press

Alabama is one of only six states that doesn't sell lottery tickets, but that could change soon.

Lawmakers in Alabama are divided on whether to legalize the lottery there to help fund Medicaid.

After years of opposition, the governor of Alabama now says legalizing the lottery is the only way to cover Medicaid costs.

Lucy Dadayan, a senior researcher with the Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute of Government, a New York-based think tank, said if they do, it could cut into Georgia's lottery sales.

Supporters of the Affordable Care Act hold up signs as the opinion for health care is reported outside of the Supreme Court in Washington, Thursday June 25, 2015.
Jacquelyn Martin / Associated Press

Georgia could pull down $8 to $9 from the federal government for every one state dollar it spends to expand Medicaid, according to a new report from the Urban Institute.

The Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit looked at Georgia and the 18 other states that have not expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.

The findings show Georgia could get from $8.86 to $9.42 for every state dollar it spends to expand the federal health program that covers the poor and disabled, depending on how many people enroll in the program.

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