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Voter Registration Numbers Surge In 6th District

May 22, 2017
David Goldman / Associated Press

More than 5,000 people have registered to vote in Georgia's 6th Congressional District in the last 19 days.

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Earlier this month, on May 4, a federal judge order the state to reopen voter registration for the runoff between Republican candidate Karen Handel and Democratic candidate Jon Ossoff. It has become one of the most closely watched congressional races in the country. Registration for the June 20 runoff closed Sunday, May 21. 

Kaitlin Kolarik / WABE

 

 

A new ad in the Georgia 6th Congressional District runoff campaign is tackling thorny issues around women's health care. In it, Democratic candidate John Ossoff attacks Republican Karen Handel on her controversial time as the head of a prominent breast cancer nonprofit.

 

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Al Such / WABE

Democratic candidate Jon Ossoff nearly won the April 18 special election to replace Tom Price as the U.S. House member from Georgia's 6th Congressional District.  Now, he faces Republican Karen Handel in the June 20 runoff in a district that has been solidly Republican for years.  

On "Morning Edition," Denis O'Hayer talked with Ossoff about a wide range of issues, including reports of President Donald Trump disclosing classified information to Russian officials; healthcare reform; and whether Ossoff could take the independent course he has promised if he were elected.

Fenly Foxen / WABE

Tuesday on "Closer Look with Rose Scott and Jim Burress":

John Bazemore / WABE

Voters in some suburban Atlanta communities are choosing their next state senator.

 

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Democrat Christine Triebsch and Republican Kay Kirkpatrick are on today's ballot in the 32nd state Senate district. The district includes portions of Cobb and Fulton counties.

 

Polls are open from 7 a.m. until 7 p.m.

 

Voters cast ballots in Georgia's primary election at a polling site in a firehouse Tuesday, March 1, 2016, in Atlanta.
David Goldman / Associated Press

There’s a small election Tuesday in Atlanta’s suburbs, but it could be a sign of big political changes coming to the Georgia Statehouse. State Senate District 32 in east Cobb County sits inside a political district getting a lot more attention, and money right now: Georgia’s 6th Congressional District.

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Susan Walsh / Associated Press file

Even in a world that is now accustomed to big surprises, it was a dizzying week in politics.

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President Donald Trump, who had just visited the Atlanta area to support Karen Handel's 6th Congressional District campaign, abruptly fired FBI Director James Comey. 

That event, in turn, could affect the close battle for the seat left vacant by Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price -- at least according to political strategists Brian Robinson and Tharon Johnson.

Al Such and Kaitlin Kolarik

It won’t be decided until June 20, but there’s already a big winner in the special election for Georgia’s 6th District Congressional race: Atlanta's local TV stations.  

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David Goldman / Associated Press

The Republican in a closely watched suburban Atlanta congressional race is echoing the White House after President Donald Trump fired FBI Director James Comey.

Karen Handel says Trump's move is "probably overdue." Her Wednesday statement says Comey "lost the confidence of Republicans, Democrats and broader institutions."

Handel says Trump should "quickly nominate a strong, independent" successor. But she makes no mention of the FBI's inquiry into Trump's ties to Russia, and she says nothing about calls for a special prosecutor.

Associated Press

Those wishing to vote in the 6th Congressional District runoff and have not registered have until May 21 to do so.

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A federal judge last week ordered the state of Georgia to re-open registration for the June 20 runoff between Republican Karen Handel and Democrat Jon Ossoff.

Kaitlin Kolarik / WABE

The husband of Karen Handel, the Republican candidate in the 6th Congressional District runoff, sent out and later deleted a racially charged social media message on Tuesday.

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Manuel Balce Ceneta / Associated Press

Move over Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton, Republicans have a new campaign boogeyman. Well, sort of new.

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Mary Claire Kelly / WABE

A coalition of civil rights groups is challenging a Georgia law that doesn't allow new voters to register before a closely watched runoff election in the 6th Congressional District.

 

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The Washington, D.C.-based Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under the Law filed a federal lawsuit Thursday in Atlanta on behalf of the groups.

 

The registration deadline was March 20.

 

How 6th District Residents Feel About The Runoff Election

Apr 20, 2017
Al Such / WABE

The congressional election in Georgia's 6th Congressional District has garnered international attention over the last few months. But after the election last night ended with a call for a runoff election, some 6th District residents have mixed feelings about the campaigning that will inevitably continue for the next two months.

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Maureen Coleman lives in Milton, towards the northern part of the 6th District. She says she's not looking forward to the next two months. 

Al Such and Kaitlin Kolarik / WABE

President Trump is weighing in on the 6th Congressional District race. And that could have mixed results for the Republican candidate.

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In a tweet, the president congratulated Republican Karen Handel for making it into a runoff with Democrat Jon Ossoff.

Handel, also on Twitter, thanked the president for calling her this morning.

Kaitlin Kolarik

More than 40 percent of all registered voters in Georgia’s 6th Congressional District cast ballots on Tuesday, a high figure for a special election. 

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Kaitlin Kolarik

Republican Karen Handel told supporters gathered in Roswell Tuesday night that by morning the campaign would start anew and called on Republicans to unite around her.

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The former Georgia secretary of state will face Democrat Jon Ossoff in a runoff for the 6th Congressional District. Ossoff ended up with 48 percent of the voted, lower than the clear marjority he would have needed for an outright win. Handel came in second with just shy of 20 percent of the vote.

Paul Sancya / Associated Press

A Georgia congressional election in a historically conservative district is headed to a runoff that raises the stakes in an early measure for President Donald Trump and both major parties ahead of the 2018 midterm elections.

Democrat Jon Ossoff, a 30-year-old former congressional staffer, fell a few percentage points shy of an outright victory amid an 18-candidate scramble in Georgia's 6th Congressional District. Republican Karen Handel, a former Georgia secretary of state, finished a distant second, qualifying for the June 20 runoff.

AP file

After months of listening to ads, robocalls, and door-to-door campaign volunteers, voters in Georgia's 6th Congressional District finally get to have their say.

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Voters cast ballots in Georgia's primary election at a polling site in a firehouse Tuesday, March 1, 2016, in Atlanta.
David Goldman / Associated Press

Early voting in the Georgia 6th Congressional District special election ends on Friday in a race that figures to continue generating national attention into the summer.

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John Bazemore, file / Associated Press

 

Karen Handel is running for Congress, but she said she didn't have anything to do with a recent fundraising letter that claims she aims to "end Muslim immigration."

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Handel Endorsement Could Aid Kingston

May 29, 2014
Jack Kingston and David Perdue
Wikipedia; perduesenate.com

Former U.S. Senate candidate Karen Handel’s decision to endorse U.S. Rep. Jack Kingston could give him a boost in a GOP primary runoff contest for U.S. Senate.  Meanwhile, the endorsement could be a blow for Kingston’s opponent businessman David Perdue.

Several political experts say endorsements don’t usually mean much. However, in a primary runoff race where turnout is expected to be low and every vote counts, they say Handel’s endorsement could make a difference.

Handel Endorses Kingston in Senate Race

May 28, 2014
Chris Ferguson/WABE

After coming in third during the recent Republican primary, former U.S. Senate candidate and Georgia Secretary of State Karen Handel threw her support Wednesday behind a former opponent. Handel endorsed U.S. Representative Jack Kingston in the GOP primary runoff race for Senate.

In Atlanta, Handel smiled as she stood next to Kingston. She explained why she chose to support him rather than his runoff opponent, former Dollar General CEO David Perdue.

Handel Misses Republican Runoff

May 21, 2014
Michelle Wirth/WABE News

Despite gaining momentum in the polls prior to election day, former Georgia Secretary of State Karen Handel came in third in the Republican Primary for U.S. Senate.

Early in the evening Handel was optimistic, but hours later she gave what appeared to be a concession speech. Handel told supporters, “We gave it our best shot.”

“I don’t want anybody to be sad, because there’s no shame in doing this well with how little we started with," said Handel.

Handel then urged supporters to get behind either businessman David Perdue or Congressman Jack Kingston.

A Detailed Overview of the Georgia GOP Senate Race

May 17, 2014

The national political spotlight shifts to Georgia as POLITICO takes a close look at the Georgia GOP's fight to select a candidate for U.S. Senate. It's an interesting read for the last weekend ahead of Tuesday's primary election.

All eight Republican candidates participated in this second of seven debates.
Aleck Ragsdale / WABE

All eight Georgia Republicans trying to get the party’s U.S. Senate nomination share the same view on the Affordable Care Act: they want it repealed. But on foreign policy, the candidates have different views. Those differences were on display for the 600 people who attended a debate in Kennesaw this weekend. 


Karen Handel Announces Run for U.S. Senate

May 17, 2013

Former Georgia Secretary of State Karen Handel announced today she's running for the U.S. Senate in 2014.

She’s vying for the seat now held by Saxby Chambliss, who has said he won’t seek reelection.

In a written statement, Handel said she’s running so “the next young person who ends up on his or her own at 17 will have the opportunity to prosper and achieve.” She added Washington needed “big changes.”

Handel, who nearly won the GOP nomination for Governor in 2010, joins a field that includes Congressmen Paul Broun, Jack Kingston, and Phil Gingrey.

Kay Scott is the President and CEO of Planned Parenthood Southeast, based in Atlanta.  She is retiring from the organization on December 28, 2012, after 32 years.  During her time at Planned Parenthood, Scott has been in the middle of many debates and battles, but she says she always tries to show respect for her opponents.

Former Georgia Secretary of State Karen Handel attracted national attention, and debate, when she left her job as an executive at Susan G. Komen for the Cure, which works to fight breast cancer.  Handel was involved in the decision to end grants from Komen to Planned Parenthood, for its breast cancer screening and awareness efforts.  Some Komen supporters had opposed the grants, because Planned Parenthood also provides abortion services.  But when word of the decision got out, Komen faced a firestorm of criticism, and Handel left the organization.

Former Georgia Secretary of State Karen Handel attracted national attention, and debate, when she left her job as an executive at Susan G. Komen for the Cure, which works to fight breast cancer.  Handel was involved in the decision to end grants from Komen to Planned Parenthood, for its breast cancer screening and awareness efforts.  Some Komen supporters had opposed the grants, because Planned Parenthood also provides abortion services.  But when word of the decision got out, Komen faced a firestorm of criticism, and Handel left the organization.