Features | WABE 90.1 FM

Features

In this Sunday April 10, 2016 photo, a parishioner reads the bible before a service at the Christian Fellowship Church in Benton, Ky.
David Goldman / Associated Press

Pastor Richie Clendenen stepped away from the pulpit, microphone in hand. He walked the aisles of the Christian Fellowship Church, his voice rising to describe the perils believers face in 21st-century America.

"The Bible says in this life you will have troubles, you will have persecutions. And Jesus takes it a step further: You'll be hated by all nations for my name's sake," he said.

"Let me tell you," the minister said, "that time is here."

60 Minutes/CBS via AP

Morley Safer, the veteran "60 Minutes" correspondent who was equally at home reporting on social injustices, the Orient Express and abstract art, and who exposed a military atrocity in Vietnam that played an early role in changing Americans' view of the war, died Thursday, according to Kevin Tedesco, a CBS News publicist.

Safer, who had been in declining health, died at his home in Manhattan. He announced his retirement last week and "60 Minutes" aired a tribute hour on Sunday, which he watched from his home, Tedesco said.

Courtney Quirin / associated press file

A year ago, a South African rhino survived a horrific attack by poachers who hacked off her horns and part of her face. This month, the rhino dubbed Hope is undergoing new facial reconstruction to reduce the wound over her exposed sinus cavities.

Boys’ High was one of Atlanta’s first public high schools.

It closed almost 70 years ago, in 1947, and became Grady High School. But the students who attended Boys’ High never forgot it, even as some approach a hundred years old.

The alumni gathered recently for a reunion, including all of the classes that are left. The earliest graduating year among the more than hundred men who came out was 1935. The last group to walk the campus of Boys' High finished in 1949, after two years at Grady.

Mary Claire Kelly / WABE

On a pollen-saturated spring morning, Panola Mountain naturalist and interpretive ranger Lieren Forbes hops and twirls in her khaki uniform on a rock outcrop of the mountain. The exercise, which Forbes calls "Stay on the Gray," is similar to the children's game "The Floor Is Lava," but it's not just for fun.

Pages