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Ringo H.W. Chiu / associated press file

Traffic deaths surged last year as drivers racked up more miles behind the wheel than ever before, a result of an improved economy and lower gas prices, according to preliminary government data released Friday.

Fatalities rose 7.7 percent to 35,200 in 2015, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said. That overall rate was significantly outpaced by non-motorist traffic deaths: Bicycle fatalities were up 13 percent; pedestrian deaths rose 10 percent, and motorcyclist deaths rose by 9 percent.

Karen Butler still remembers the first time she picked up an AR-15-style rifle a decade ago.

"Quite honestly, I was scared of it," she recalls.

But as soon as she fired it, she became a fan.

"You know some of these paeople that are fearful, it's just because they don't have knowledge," she said. "We call it furniture — it's got all the accessories on it that make it look a little intimidating. But once you shoot it you realize it's so much fun."

Higher Workloads Are Leaving US Doctors In Distress

Jun 22, 2016
JD Lasica / jdlasica/flickr.com

Long hours, higher patient load, financial pressures, and a pile of bureaucracy: Physician burnout is on the rise in the United States.

“I think that medicine is all encompassing,” said Dr. Lisa Robbins, a primary care physician with a practice in Stone Mountain. “It just takes up so much of your energy, your time, your whole self.”

Robbins has been a doctor for over 20 years. She said there have been many moments in her career where she felt empty, exhausted, without joy. “It got to the point where there was nothing else in my life outside of medicine,” she said.  

Courtesy of Marie

Update on June 23, 11:32 a.m.: The Supreme Court has ruled in a 4-4 tie vote, which leaves in place a lower court decision blocking President Barack Obama's DAPA immigration program.

Marie*, 21, has a lot on her mind.

“I worry. I worry all the time,” she said.

She said she worries that her parents will be deported, leaving her and her two younger sisters behind in their suburban Atlanta home.

“If they leave, it’s just – it would hurt the family,” she said.

Harriet Tubman grave site
Mike Groll / Associated Press

Harriet Tubman's upcoming debut on the $20 bill is just half the good news in the upstate New York town where the Underground Railroad conductor settled down and grew old.

A long-sought national historical park here honoring Tubman could be officially established as early as this summer. The move would give a boost to preservation efforts at her old home and church just as the former slave is poised to replace President Andrew Jackson as the face of the $20 bill.

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