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Elly Yu / WABE

Atlanta police Officer Mike Costello is one of those guys that still loves vinyl records.

“This is precious cargo, right here,” he says, pointing to his record collection. It’s moving day for Costello on a Wednesday earlier this spring, and boxes of items are still scattered around his new house – but he already has his records neatly lined up.

A New Jersey native, Costello picks out a Bruce Springsteen record to play while he and his family unpack.

Bob Galbraith / Associated Press

This story is part of "Atlanta Remembers: The 1996 Olympics," WABE's series on the impact of the 1996 Summer Olympics on Atlanta, 20 years later. For more stories, click here.

Editor's note: This story includes language and some descriptions of violence.

Stephannie Stokes, Historic American Buildings Survey / WABE, Library of Congress

This story is part of "Atlanta Remembers: The 1996 Olympics," WABE's series on the impact of the 1996 Summer Olympics on Atlanta, 20 years later. For more stories, click here. 

Walking down Merritts Avenue, at the edge of Centennial Place, Renee Glover points out the townhomes with well-groomed landscapes.

“As you can see, it’s a beautiful community,” Glover said. “It’s quiet.”

Glover directed the Atlanta Housing Authority during the 1996 Olympics.

Alison Guillory / WABE

 This story is part of "Atlanta Remembers: The 1996 Olympics," WABE's series on the impact of the 1996 Summer Olympics on Atlanta, 20 years later. For more stories, click here. 

Pete Menzies and his 6-year-old son, Dylan, are in line to order milkshakes at a snack booth in Centennial Olympic Park in Atlanta.

“Chocolate,” comes Dylan’s request when asked what flavor he wants, mumbled into his dad's leg.

Dylan is in the middle of a weeklong aquarium “camp.”

Elise Amendola / Associated Press

When a Navy submarine goes to sea on a monthslong voyage, the lettuce, tomatoes and other fresh fruits and vegetables on board run out in a week or two, forcing the crew to rely on canned, frozen or dehydrated products.

But what if subs had their own gardens where food could be grown under lights?

The U.S. military is testing out the idea by growing plants hydroponically — that is, with nutrient solution instead of soil — inside a 40-foot shipping container on dry land at a laboratory outside Boston.

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