Features

Don Ryan / Associated Press

Short of savings and burdened by debt, America's millennials are struggling to afford their first homes in the face of sharply higher prices in many of the most desirable cities.

Surveys show that most Americans under 35 lack adequate savings for down payments. The result is that many will likely be forced to delay home ownership and to absorb significant debt loads if they do eventually buy.

We watch with fascination as candidates for the world's most powerful job trade falsehoods and allegations of dishonesty.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump routinely calls rival Ted Cruz "Lyin' Ted." Cruz retorts: "Falsely accusing someone of lying is itself a lie and something Donald does daily."

News organizations such as The Associated Press and PolitiFact dedicate enormous resources to separating candidates' truthful wheat from their dishonest chaff.

thomas hawk / flickr.com/thomashawk

  

In Georgia, as in some other states, law enforcement can take property from a person if they suspect it's connected to a crime, but they do not necessarily have to charge or convict that person with that crime. It's a process known as civil asset forfeiture. According to Georgia law, to keep the property, the government must show with a "preponderance of the evidence" that it's connected to a crime.

NASA / Wikimedia Commons

Global warming is shifting the way the Earth wobbles on its polar axis, a new NASA study finds.

Melting ice sheets — especially in Greenland — are changing the distribution of weight on Earth. And that has caused both the North Pole and the wobble, which is called polar motion, to change course, according to a study published Friday in the journal Science Advances.

Al Such / Public Broadcasting Atlanta

The name Brannon Hill Condominiums has a nice ring to it -- a name that might suggest pristine landscaping, a grilling area and maybe a playground for kids.

In fact, the development east of Interstate-285 in DeKalb County just off Memorial Drive has a play area, but it’s overgrown with weeds. 

Parts of Brannon Hill look like a landfill -- the final resting place for broken toilets, tattered sofas, busted TVs and soiled mattresses.

Parts look like the complex has just caught fire, but the bulldozers have yet to arrive to tear down the charred building's remains.

Norman Reedus attends the season five premiere of "The Walking Dead" at AMC Universal Citywalk on Thursday, Oct. 2, 2014, in Universal City, Calif.
John Shearer/Invision for AMC / Associated Press

When the lights come on, the scene in front of you isn't pretty: There's a gagged woman handcuffed to a wall, a TV on at full volume and a guy lying on a couch with a gaping belly wound.

Such is the troubling landscape that greets audience members at the beginning of the touring immersive show recreating the chilling world of "The Walking Dead," in which the world has been plagued by a zombie apocalypse. The horror drama series on AMC is one of the most popular shows on television.

hmmlargeart / flickr.com/e_hmm

A new survey says Americans are more accepting of gay relationships and couples living together before marriage — but they've grown less comfortable with divorce.

The government periodically asks teens and younger adults what they think about changes in U.S. family relationships.

In the latest survey, fewer men and women than a decade ago said divorce is the best solution when a marriage is on the rocks.

Sixty percent of women and 49 percent of men said same-sex relationships are fine.

Girl Scouts of the USA

Every year, storefronts, neighborhoods and workplaces become dotted with green, blue, brown and khaki as Girl Scouts work tirelessly to sell cookies. 

Girl Scout Cookies have origins tracing back to the 1900s, but nowadays the Girl Scouts are known for more than just pushing cookies. They work to educate and empower young women all across the globe. Today, the number of Girl Scouts in the United States is nearly equivalent to the population of Chicago: 2.7 million Scouts and volunteers, according to the Girl Scouts website.

Courtesy of Conor Beary

When Georgia Tech graduate and Atlantan Archel Bernard moved to Liberia in 2011, she wanted to be the “West African Oprah Winfrey.”

But to be a West African Oprah, she needed to dress like a West African. So she took a sketch of a dress she dreamed up to a Monrovian tailor. When she went to pick up the dress, not only was the tailor wearing her design, but so was another customer.

JHJR / Associated Press

Atlanta played a huge part in the civil rights movement of the 1960s, serving as the birthplace of Martin Luther King Jr. and home of the world’s largest museum dedicated to King, the Martin Luther King Jr. Historic Site.

Atlanta’s history regarding segregation and Jim Crow laws has led to the creation of historical landmarks such as the Sweet Auburn Historic District, an area where black businesspeople became prosperous despite the setbacks imposed on them.

A national labor union representing half of the nation's 100,000 flight attendants has come out in support of a federal bill aimed at ending human trafficking. 

Sara Nelson, president of the Association of Flight Attendants -- CWA, tells WABE's "Closer Look" the federal Secure Our Skies Act could standardize training and make existing aviation systems available to combat the sex slave trade. 

Jim Burress / WABE

A complex, multi-year plan to modernize the nation's antiquated air traffic control system is progressing on schedule, according to federal officials. And nowhere is that more evident than here in Atlanta. 

"Atlanta has been in the forefront of deploying NextGen technology," FAA Deputy Administrator Mike Whitaker tells WABE's "Closer Look."  NextGen, an umbrella term for the modernization efforts, promises to make the nation's air space less congested and safer. 

The Sun via AP, Pool / Associated Press

President Barack Obama says his unglamorous first job scooping ice cream taught him valuable lessons about responsibility and hard work.

He wants the same experience for other teenagers, particularly those without resources, and is launching a summer opportunities project to help young people land a first job that can teach them similar lessons and help send them down the right path.

The private sector, all levels of government, community groups and schools have pledged to help teenagers get their first jobs this summer.

Jacquelyn Martin / Associated Press file

Bill Cosby's wife, an enigmatic figure who has publicly stood by her husband despite the dozens of sexual assault allegations against him, is slated to answer questions under oath Monday in a defamation lawsuit filed against him by seven accusers.

Camille Cosby was being questioned by a lawyer for the women at the Springfield Marriott in Massachusetts despite futile attempts by the couple to get the deposition postponed. It is believed to be the first deposition Camille Cosby has given since dozens of women went public with allegations of sexual misconduct against her husband.

My Story As A DMV Edge Case: How To Battle Bureaucracy And Win

Feb 18, 2016

"I don't know what this is," she said, sliding the form back to me. "I'm not a doctor."

Thank you, I thought. I realize that. You work at the Department of Motor Vehicles.

When people line up at a coffee shop for their morning brew or crowd a bookstore to meet a famous author, don't assume they're patronizing a national chain.

Many independent stores have been able to survive, thrive and even launch in spite of competition from big box retailers like Wal-Mart, Barnes & Noble and Home Depot. Indies are doing this by becoming more a part of the fabric in the communities they serve, offering more personalized service and unique ambience than the bigger guys.

An employee of the Protestant parish in Besigheim points to an entry in the parish register in Besigheim, near Stuttgart, southern Germany on Thursday, June 4, 2009, which marks the ancestor of U.S. President Barack Obama.
Daniel Maurer / Associated Press

This is part of WABE’s ongoing series “Finding Your Roots.”

“Finding Your Roots With Henry Louis Gates Jr.” airs Wednesday at 6 p.m. on PBA30 TV with an encore Saturday at 7 p.m. Watch a preview of Season 3, and see the full schedule at www.pba.org/roots

In the “nature versus nurture” debate of human identity, the “nurture” part is pretty easy to figure out. You likely know how and where you grew up, and by whom.

Alison Guillory / WABE

This is part of WABE’s ongoing series “Finding Your Roots.”

“Finding Your Roots With Henry Louis Gates Jr.” airs Wednesday at 6 p.m. on PBA30 TV with an encore Saturday at 7 p.m. Watch a preview of Season 3, and see the full schedule at www.pba.org/roots

As I write this reflection regarding my response to DNA results, I’m reminded of the first time I saw the television mini-series, "Roots."  

Alison Guillory / WABE

This is part of WABE’s ongoing series “Finding Your Roots.”

“Finding Your Roots With Henry Louis Gates Jr.” airs Wednesday at 6 p.m. on PBA30 TV with an encore Saturday at 7 p.m. Watch a preview of Season 3, and see the full schedule at www.pba.org/roots

I had high hopes that, somewhere deep in my DNA, there was an untold story. A family secret. A trace of a mysterious, exotic past.

Something.

Two Atlanta convenience store owners have pleaded guilty to illegally exchanging food stamps for millions of dollars.
U.S. Department of Agriculture via flickr.com / https://flic.kr/p/83r1Zc

The Agriculture Department unveiled new rules Tuesday that would force retailers who accept food stamps to stock a wider variety of healthy foods or face the loss of business as consumers shop elsewhere.

Charles Rex Arbogast / Associated Press

When Debra Aldridge became her grandson's primary caregiver, she was making $7.50 per hour as a cook. The alternative for the newborn, she was told, was to put him up for adoption.

"I took one look at the little fella, and that was it," said Aldridge, now 62. "I couldn't let go."

For more than 11 years, Aldridge, who is divorced and lives in Chicago, has struggled to feed, house and clothe her "baby," Mario. As she ages, she is sinking deeper into poverty.

Charles Rex Arbogast / Associated Press

When Debra Aldridge became her grandson's primary caregiver, she was making $7.50 per hour as a cook. The alternative for the newborn, she was told, was to put him up for adoption.

"I took one look at the little fella, and that was it," said Aldridge, now 62. "I couldn't let go."

For more than 11 years, Aldridge, who is divorced and lives in Chicago, has struggled to feed, house and clothe her "baby," Mario. As she ages, she is sinking deeper into poverty.

At Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge in Georgia.
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Southeast Region / flickr.com/usfwssoutheast/

Sometimes what scientists need to protect a threatened species is a chainsaw, some roofing material and a little bit of creativity. On the Georgia coast, the Department of Natural Resources is channeling MacGyver to help out a big, gawky, bald-headed bird.

It’s a bird that hasn’t always nested in Georgia, but now that it does, scientists are working to protect it.

Wood Storks

Wood storks aren’t exactly conventionally beautiful.

The mayor of Cleveland apologized Thursday to the family of  Tamir Rice, a black 12-year-old boy fatally shot by a white Cleveland police officer, for the city having sent the administrator of the boy's estate a "decedent's last dying expense" claim of $500 for ambulance services.

Mayor Frank Jackson opened a City Hall news conference by saying, "We want to start off again apologizing to the Rice family if in fact this has added to any grief or pain they may have."

Tom Houck Cover
Alison Guillory / WABE

Fifty years ago, a 19-year-old Tom Houck stood in front of the Southern Christian Leadership Committee (SCLC) headquarters on Auburn Avenue and waited for a ride to the Freedom House where he was staying.

Historic Oakland Cemetery and Atlanta Skyline
Evan Jang / WABE

Growing up in the 1950s, William Bell had to enter Birmingham's segregated Lyric Theatre though a side entrance, marked "COLORED," that was walled-off from the elegant lobby. He climbed a dimly lit stairwell to watch movies from the steep balcony where black patrons had to sit for generations.

Now the mayor of Birmingham, Bell recalls the Lyric's beauty, but also the way it isolated black people.

Each of the tens of thousands of names etched into the reflective granite of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., represents not only a person who died in the name of service to country but also a face, a hometown, a personal past and loved ones left behind.

David Goldman / Associated Press

More than 30 years ago, Donald Trump bought a franchise in the upstart United States Football League. He then led his fellow owners to sue the NFL in a high-stakes antitrust case. 

The head-on challenge and his ownership of the New Jersey Generals was an early testing ground for the swashbuckling approach that the celebrity businessman-turned-Republican presidential candidate has brought to his 2016 campaign.

A World War II veteran has embarked on a 10,500-mile journey to visit his wartime girlfriend after more than 70 years apart.

93-year-old Norwood Thomas boarded a plane from Norfolk to Australia on Sunday to reunite with Joyce Morris, The Virginian-Pilot reports.

They first met in London shortly before D-Day but ended up going their separate ways after the war had ended.

Thomas calls Morris "the one that got away."

Charles Kelly / AP Photo

Back in the days of black-and-white television, Atlanta was separated – physically, economically and socially – along color lines. 

Atlanta's Sweet Auburn neighborhood, located along Auburn Avenue (formerly known as Wheat Street), served as the economic and social center for the city's African-American community. This neighborhood rose to prominence because of the city's segregation laws, but by the mid-1900s had fostered a community of individuals ready to challenge the entire Jim Crow system.

Pages