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English Avenue

Alison Guillory / WABE

Proctor Creek has been a problem for residents of 35 northwest Atlanta neighborhoods for a long time. It’s polluted. It floods.

That’s changing, though. 

Billions of dollars' worth of upgrades to the city's sewer system and plans for a series of parks address the long-running issues with the creek. 

New Community House Opens In English Avenue

Mar 31, 2017
The Mattie Freeland Community House is officially open in English Avenue.
Miranda Hawkins / WABE

It was a clear, warm day as English Avenue residents came together on Friday to honor a longtime member of the neighborhood. A red ribbon draped across the porch of a little home with purple pillars and a yellow door.

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The Mattie Freeland Community House was officially open.

A raised flower bed in Mattie Freeland Park, with the words 'We Are Better Together' painted on the side.
Molly Samuel / WABE

The Atlanta neighborhood of English Avenue doesn't have many parks, but there's one that a community got together and built themselves in honor of a local resident who was like a grandmother to her neighbors.

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Mattie Freeland was the kind of woman who always shared her food and checked in on people, say people who knew her. They called her "Miss Mattie." She passed away several years ago, but the park that’s grown next door to her house was sort of her idea.

Alison Guillory / WABE

Some fish that live in one of Atlanta's creeks, a tributary to the Chattahoochee River, have elevated levels of chemicals in their bodies, including pesticides that went out of use in the 1980s.

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Proctor Creek, on Atlanta’s Westside, has had issues with e. coli and fecal coliform bacteria caused by sewer overflows, but a new report from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency documents man-made toxic chemicals in fish caught at a fishing spot in Bankhead, near Maddox Park.

Stephannie Stokes / WABE

Atlanta officials and business leaders broke ground on a new youth center on the city's Westside Wednesday. The site chosen for redevelopment sat in an area of English Avenue filled with gutted homes.

"In the hills of all the blight that you see here,” said outgoing Atlanta Police Chief George Turner in his remarks, “there are still men and women that have a desire to raise their family and make a difference in their lives.”

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