Dan Immergluck | WABE 90.1 FM

Dan Immergluck

Ali Guillory / WABE

Housing prices near the BeltLine are rising faster than in the rest of Atlanta, according to a new study.

That probably comes as little surprise to anyone familiar with the popular path and the businesses and homes that spring up around it. But now, Dan Immergluck, a professor at the School of City and Regional planning at Georgia Tech, has quantified it.

Boarded-up houses and kudzo covered houses are a common sight in the English Ave and Vine City communities
Alison Guillory / WABE

 A new research paper is sounding the alarm over rising rents on Atlanta’s west side, where the BeltLine is slated for paving.

Dan Immergluck, professor of City and Regional Planning at Georgia Tech, wrote the paper. Its bottom line: Affordable housing on Atlanta’s west side should be established now, before land values and property taxes rise any higher.

Charles W. Jones / WABE

Caroline Huftalen has lived in Atlanta for six years, in the Cabbagetown-Reynoldstown area, specifically. She’s a writer and the marketing director for Seven Stages, a nonprofit theater company in Little Five Points. And recently, she had to move.

Huftalen had been renting a 700-square-foot unit in a condo building for $975 in the neighborhood, but this summer, building officials reinstated a two-year renting rule, forcing her out. Huftalen says she quickly learned $1,000 for a one bedroom apartment or studio didn’t go as far as it did a few years ago.

Theodore Lee / flickr.com/serpicolugnut

Atlanta lost nearly 5,000 low-cost rental units from 2010 to 2013, according to a new analysis released by a Georgia Tech professor.

The study, compiled by regional planning professor Dan Immergluck, says the metro area has been experiencing an apartment boom since the recession. As of March, there were 11,000 units under construction and another 9,000 proposed, according to cited research from Haddow and Co.