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Former President Jimmy Carter speaks with WABE's Denis O'Hayer about his efforts to eradicate Guinea worm disease.
Alison Guillory / WABE

An auction raising money for the human rights organization founded by Jimmy Carter will include a four-poster bed designed by the former president.

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The annual event raises money for The Carter Center, which is based in Atlanta. The auction is part of a four-day retreat to be held this year near Lake Tahoe, California from Wednesday to Sunday.

Alex Sanz / Associated Press

Former President Jimmy Carter says he's in good health -- and writing a new book. On Tuesday, he told participants at a conference on human rights that he plans to include their work and thoughts in the book.

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“I'm not going to concentrate on hope,” he said. “I'm certainly not going to concentrate on despair. I'm not going to concentrate on anything except, I'm going to use the word, faith.”

Kaitlin Kolarik

Former President Jimmy Carter said Monday night, he voted for Sen. Bernie Sanders in the 2016 presidential primary.

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The two were speaking to a group of human rights activists at the Carter Center in Atlanta.

Carter and Sanders both pointed to economic inequality as a major reason President Donald Trump was elected. 

“I’m relieved to know that Sen. Sanders agrees with me,” Carter said.

Molly Samuel / WABE

Experts on climate change and public health gathered at the Carter Center on Thursday for a conference put together to replace one with a similar agenda the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention put on hold.

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Alison Guillory / WABE

A conference on climate change and health is back on but apparently minus the U.S. government.

Several organizers including former Vice President Al Gore have resurrected the meeting set for next month in Atlanta.

The government's top public health agency had planned the conference then canceled it in December without explanation.

Former President Jimmy Carter speaks with WABE's Denis O'Hayer about his efforts to eradicate Guinea worm disease.
Alison Guillory / WABE

On Jan. 20, former President Jimmy Carter will be at the inauguration of President-elect Donald Trump. When the two men meet, the former president says he'll talk to the new one about the Carter Center's three-decade effort to eradicate Guinea worm disease, which has long plagued parts of Africa. The parasite, which people get from drinking contaminated water, can disable victims for months.

David Goldman / Associated Press

President Jimmy Carter says he plans to meet with President-elect Donald Trump to highlight the effort to eradicate Guinea worm disease.

Neil Hall / Pool Photo via AP

Jimmy Carter says allegations that this fall's elections will be rigged are "baseless."

The former president released a statement on Wednesday along with The Carter Center, the human rights organization he founded after leaving the White House. Carter's statement doesn't specifically mention Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, who has repeatedly complained that the election is rigged against him.

The Carter Center has monitored more than 100 elections around the world, but never in the U.S. Carter says he's seen "problematic" elections in that work.

Former President Jimmy Carter
John Bazemore / Associated Press

Jimmy Carter says the world is at a "turning point in history" and must choose policies of peace and human rights over war and suffering.

Carter's remarks on Monday opened a forum of human rights workers hosted by The Carter Center in Atlanta, attended by more than 60 global activists. Carter, now 91, said governments cannot end terrorism and other violence without reducing "excessive state violence." Carter said he'd like the United States to become "the undisputed champion of peace," a place where countries could turn when threatened with war or violence.

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter delivers a lecture on the eradication of the Guinea worm, at the House of Lords in London, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016.
Neil Hall/Pool Photo via AP

Former President Jimmy Carter keeps winning in his fight against cancer.

The 91-year-old said he no longer needs treatments against the disease. Carter made the announcement at the start of his Sunday School class in Plains, according to CNN.

According to a statement from the Carter Center, Carter will still get MRIs and scans, but doctors say things look good for now.

If that changes, doctors say treatments will resume.

In August, four small melanoma lesions were found on Carter's brain.

Carter also had a lesion on his liver removed last year. 

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter delivers a lecture on the eradication of the Guinea worm, at the House of Lords in London, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016.
Neil Hall/Pool Photo via AP

President Jimmy Carter says he imagines inequality in this country could be an issue the Carter Center decides to work on some day, as opposed to the international work the organization typically focuses on.

Carter spoke on a panel Wednesday evening with the current -- and a past -- president of Emory University.

"I think now that the difference in relative standing socially and economically between the very poor people on the one hand and the middle class who are going downward and the upper class is becoming a very serious problem," he said.

Brenna Beech / WABE

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter says that Guinea worm disease may soon be eradicated, which would be the most exciting accomplishment of his career, although progress is hampered by ongoing conflict in Mali and South Sudan.

Carter has led a campaign since 1986 through his foundation, the Carter Center, to rid the world of the once-widespread disease. With only 22 cases worldwide last year, they may now be on the cusp of wiping it out forever.

Former President Jimmy Carter teaches during Sunday School class at Maranatha Baptist Church in his hometown, Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015, in Plains, Ga.
Branden Camp / Associated Press

Former President Jimmy Carter has been honored for his efforts toward peace and human rights though a foundation of another former president.

The 91-year-old Carter was awarded the LBJ Liberty and Justice for All Award during a ceremony Wednesday in Atlanta. The Lyndon B. Johnson Foundation presented Carter the awarded with his wife, Rosalynn, at his side.

Elise Amendola / Associated Press

Jimmy Carter says it's too soon to tell whether treatment he received has been effective against cancer on his brain.

But the 91-year-old former U.S. president tells The Associated Press he hasn't been uncomfortable or ill while receiving rounds of immune-boosting drugs to help fight the illness.

Brenna Beech / WABE

Former President Jimmy Carter is still active here in Georgia and around the world, despite his cancer diagnosis early last summer. Carter has had a long life in public service and part of that is thanks, in part, to one man.

Carter’s former chief of staff during his White House years was Hamilton Jordan. Jordan was also one of the architects of Carter's campaigns for Georgia governor and for U.S. president.

But that was just one chapter in Jordan's extraordinary – and sometimes controversial – life.

Elise Amendola / Associated Press

Former President Jimmy Carter is stepping in to help resolve a legal battle over Rev. Martin Luther King Junior's traveling Bible and his 1964 Nobel Peace Prize medal.  

The late civil rights leader's estate is controlled by his sons, who last year asked a judge to order their sister to surrender the items. In a board of directors meeting, Martin Luther King III and Dexter Scott King voted 2-1 against Bernice King to sell the two artifacts to a private buyer.

Salman Rushdie at the Canada 2020 Crossing Boundaries Conference on March 26, 2007.
Canada 2020 / flickr.com/canada2020

 

Salman Rushdie's new novel, "Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights," seems to transpose the “Arabian Nights” of long ago to modern-day New York City. A thunderstorm overturns the city and upsets the laws of the universe with myth and magic.

Rushdie wrote: “This is a story from our past, so far back we may argue about whether it's history, mythology or fairy tale. On this we agree: that to tell a story about the past is to tell a story about the present.”

In this Oct. 27, 2014 file photo, Georgia Democratic gubernatorial candidate Jason Carter, former President Jimmy Carter’s grandson, speaks during a campaign stop in Columbus, Ga.
David Goldman / AP Photo, File

Former President Jimmy Carter announced plans on Thursday to cut back on many of his activities at the Carter Center in Atlanta as he focuses on his cancer treatment.

Carter also revealed his grandson Jason Carter, a former state senator and a 2014 Democratic candidate for Georgia governor, has been named the new chairman of the Carter Center Board of Trustees. The board selected Jason Carter for the position back in March, according to President Carter.

Former President Jimmy Carter radiates positivity at a press conference at The Carter Center in Atlanta on Thursday, August 20, 2015 to announce that his cancer has spread to four small spots on his brain, but that he is at ease.
Brenna Beech / WABE

It was found in his liver and then in his brain, but very well may have started in his skin. Former President Jimmy Carter revealed Thursday that he has melanoma, a serious form of cancer.

Carter, who will turn 91 in October, said he has already begun treatments for four small brain tumors.

A look at more about his situation:

When was the cancer discovered?

Former President Jimmy Carter speaks during the memorial service for Rev. Theodore Hesburgh on Wednesday, March 4, 2015, inside the Purcell Pavilion at the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Ind.
South Bend Tribune, Robert Franklin, Pool / Associated Press

 

  
Former President Jimmy Carter plans to discuss his recent cancer diagnosis today for the first time since revealing last week that he was ill.

Carter, 90, is scheduled to hold a news conference at 10 a.m. at the Carter Center in Atlanta. The event will be closed to the public.

Carter announced Aug. 12 that liver surgery found cancer that has spread to other parts of his body. The three-sentence statement did not identify the cancer or say where it originated.

Former President Jimmy Carter speaks during the memorial service for Rev. Theodore Hesburgh on Wednesday, March 4, 2015, inside the Purcell Pavilion at the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Ind.
South Bend Tribune, Robert Franklin, Pool / Associated Press

 

A statement issued Tuesday by the Carter Center says the 90-year-old will address reporters Thursday morning in Atlanta.

Carter revealed on Wednesday that he had been diagnosed with cancer. In a brief statement, he said a surgery to remove a small mass from his liver had revealed cancer that had spread to other parts of his body. He said he planned to undergo treatment at Emory Healthcare in Atlanta and promised more details soon.

Former President Jimmy Carter speaks during the memorial service for Rev. Theodore Hesburgh on Wednesday, March 4, 2015, inside the Purcell Pavilion at the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Ind.
South Bend Tribune, Robert Franklin, Pool / Associated Press

Doctors say former President Jimmy Carter's cancer treatment will depend on the type of cancer, its origin and factors such as age and health.

Carter announced Wednesday that recent liver surgery found cancer that has spread to other parts of his body and he will be undergoing treatment.

The deputy chief medical officer of the American Cancer Society, Dr. Len Lichtenfeld, says the first task likely will be determining where the cancer originated, which can help determine what treatment the 90-year-old Carter may be eligible for.

Former President Jimmy Carter at the Carter Center in Atlanta, July 15, 2015
Jason Parker / WABE

The Carter Center has released a statement from former President Jimmy Carter saying he has been diagnosed with cancer.

Carter, 90, underwent a medical procedure on Aug. 3 to remove a small mass in his liver. At the time the Carter Center released a statement that the procedure was done without issues and the prognosis was "excellent for a full recovery."

Carter says that he is arranging his schedule to be treated at Emory Healthcare.

Former President Jimmy Carter at the Carter Center in Atlanta, July 15, 2015
Jason Parker / WABE

The Carter Center says former President Jimmy Carter has undergone a medical procedure to remove a small mass in his liver, and that he's expected to make a full recovery.

A statement released by Carter's spokeswoman Deanna Congileo described Monday's operation at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta as an elective procedure.

It said the procedure was done without issues, and that the prognosis "is excellent for a full recovery." The Carter Center's statement offered no other details.

From Farmer To Humanitarian: Jimmy Carter On His 'Full Life'

Jul 15, 2015
In this July 10, 2015, file photo, former President Jimmy Carter is seen in Philadelphia.
Matt Rourke, File / Associated Press

    

Former President Jimmy Carter isn’t slowing down. At 90-years-old, the Nobel Peace Prize winner, international humanitarian and former Georgia governor is still working through his Atlanta-based Carter Center to eradicate diseases in some of the most impoverished places in the world and to ensure free elections in countries across the globe.

Carter, the 39th President of the United States, won the presidency in 1976; then he lost his re-election bid to Ronald Reagan in 1980.

The Carter Center

Georgia is in negotiations with the federal government over a 2010 settlement reached with the U.S. Justice Department. By June 30, the state was supposed to move all people with developmental disabilities out of state-run hospitals and into community settings. But the state is not going to meet to that deadline.

Photo silhouette of a boy and his shadow.
~ kyu / flickr.com/~ kyu

At the Carter Center in Atlanta this week, the first World Summit to End Human Trafficking took place. Coinciding with the event, Atlanta-based organization youthSpark is releasing a new study about the sex trade involving young males.

It’s the first ever regarding adolescent boys.

Former President Jimmy Carter speaks during the memorial service for Rev. Theodore Hesburgh on Wednesday, March 4, 2015, inside the Purcell Pavilion at the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Ind.
South Bend Tribune, Robert Franklin, Pool / Associated Press

Carter Center officials say former U.S. President Jimmy Carter has cut short an election observation visit in Guyana due to health reasons.

Sunday's statement from the Center says the 90-year-old ex-president is returning to Atlanta. It did not disclose specifics, only saying Carter was "not feeling well."

The Guyana observer mission marks the Carter Center's 100th mission. Staffers will remain in the South American country to observe the vote.

It would have been Carter's 39th trip to personally observe an international election.

The Carter Center

Rose Scott is covering the National Symposium on the Modern Death Penalty in America, hosted by the American Bar Association and the Carter Center.  She's been live-tweeting from the discussion, which we've been re-tweeting.  We've also assembled her tweets below.

President Carter Favors Diplomatic Solution in Syria

Sep 11, 2013
President and Mrs. Carter speak during a discussion held at the Carter Center Tuesday evening.
Michelle Wirth / WABE

Tuesday night, President Obama said he would put off a military strike if Syria’s president agrees to a Russian proposal to put the country’s chemical weapons under international control. Prior to the speech, former President Jimmy Carter told those gathered at the Carter Center he was against any military action in the country and favored a diplomatic solution.

President Carter doubts a limited military strike will bring about change in Syria. That’s why Carter hopes the U.S. can reach a solution when Secretary of State John Kerry travels to Switzerland this week.

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