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atlanta sales tax

Kim Kenney / Atlanta Ballet

A proposed sales tax to create a steady stream of funding for the arts in Atlanta appears to be dead.

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Mayor Kasim Reed needed Georgia lawmakers to sign off on the plan in order to put it before voters as a referendum in November. The idea was to let constituents decide whether they wanted to pay a one-tenth of a penny tax to support music, dance, theater or other artistic ventures in the city.

MARTA bus in traffic, Jan. 19, 2015, Atlanta
Alison Guillory / WABE

Atlanta-area voters will have a chance to vote on three sales tax measures as part of the general election.  The ballot items would put money toward different types of transportation-related projects in different parts of the Atlanta area.

MARTA Referenda

Atlanta voters will have a chance to vote for or against a half-penny sales tax that would put money toward MARTA for the next 40 years. It would take effect in 2017. 

Alison Guillory / WABE

A MARTA expansion bill that passed the Georgia Legislature late Thursday night sets the stage for Atlanta voters to direct tax money to the agency.

It would also allow the rest of Fulton County to direct a three-quarters of a penny sales tax to transportation projects, which could include transit.

County Commission Chairman John Eaves said he's “ecstatic” the Legislature passed the bill.

“There are a lot of bridges in the county that have not been renovated, resurfaced, etc. over the past many years,” Eaves said.

Ken Teegardin / Flickr.com/teegardin

A Republican state senator says he plans to introduce legislation this week to decrease the personal income tax rate in Georgia from 6 percent to a flat rate of 5.4 percent.

State Senator Judson Hill (R-Marietta) said the “Tax Relief Act of 2016” would also increase personal exemptions by $2,000 per person, while maintaining the current sales tax rate of 4 percent.

WhosThisValGirl / flickr.com/whosthisvalgirl

On Wednesday, Atlanta City Council members are scheduled to consider asking voters to extend a 1 percent sales tax until 2020 to complete millions of dollars of federally mandated sewer upgrades and repairs. 

Councilwoman Natalyn Archibong from District 5 has proposed legislation that if passed by the council would have city voters decide March 1, 2016, on the tax that was first established in 2004. 

Archibong said the city needs to find $100 million to meet the federal mandate, but there are other projects that need attention, too.