Arts

Arts and culture

Courtesy of True Colors Theatre Company

Thursday on "City Lights with Lois Reitzes":

Jack Davis, the prolific Mad magazine illustrator, cartoonist and movie poster artist, has died.

He died Wednesday morning, according to his son-in-law, Chris Lloyd. He died in St. Simons, Georgia, of natural causes. He was 91.

As a struggling young artist in New York, Davis was "about ready to give up, go home to Georgia and be either a forest ranger or a farmer," he recalled in an interview a few years ago. Then, in 1950, he scored the first of many sales of his artwork to EC Comics, which published a line of horror titles including "Tales from the Crypt."

Gabbie Watts / WABE

This Cultural Olympiad story was produced in partnership with ArtsATL as part of "Atlanta Remembers: The 1996 Olympics," WABE's series on the impact of the 1996 Summer Olympics on Atlanta, 20 years later. For more stories, click here. 

BreeAnne Clowdus / Serenbe Playhouse

Wednesday on "City Lights with Lois Reitzes"

BreeAnne Clowdus / Serenbe Playhouse

A Huey helicopter flies low over a field at Serenbe, about an hour south of Atlanta. This isn’t a military exercise or a film shoot, but Serenbe Playhouse's theatrical production of "Miss Saigon," the story of star-crossed lovers in war-torn Vietnam. 

Executive and artistic director Brian Clowdus spent eight months convincing the Army Aviation Heritage Foundation, based in Hampton, Georgia, to participate.

Courtesy of Leslie Gordon

This Cultural Olympiad story was produced in partnership with ArtsATL as part of "Atlanta Remembers: The 1996 Olympics," WABE's series on the impact of the 1996 Summer Olympics on Atlanta, 20 years later. For more stories, click here  

Twenty years ago, the Olympic Games brought the world’s athletes to Atlanta. It also brought Nobel laureates.

Mary Claire Kelly / WABE

When best-selling author Joshilyn Jackson started writing her latest book, “Origin Story,” she had William Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily” and the biblical story about Leah and Rachel on her mind, not race. Now that she’s written it, however, race seems to be the main theme running through the novel.

In this installment of “Writer to Reader,” Jackson explores how the national conversation surrounding race and recent police shootings of unarmed black men has shaped her novel.

Mary Claire Kelly / WABE

Tuesday on "City Lights with Lois Reitzes":

This Cultural Olympiad story was produced in partnership with ArtsATL as part of "Atlanta Remembers: The 1996 Olympics," WABE's series on the impact of the 1996 Summer Olympics on Atlanta, 20 years later. For more stories, click here

Courtesy Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport

Imagine this: It's your 11th birthday. Some lady you don't know takes your photo at Centennial Olympic Park. Next thing you know, your face is on prominent display at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, where it remains for 15 years.

For ArtsATL.com and WABE's ‪‎Atlanta's Cultural Olympiad programming, ArtsATL executive editor Laura Relyea interviews Lori Cord about her experience being included in Deborah Whitehouse's 70-foot mural, "The Spirit of Atlanta".

M. Spencer Green / Associated Press

Monday on "City Lights with Lois Reitzes":

Myke Johns / WABE

It’s not often that you hear someone talk openly about the worst thing they ever did. Rarer still that they’d put up a memorial to it. But that’s exactly what Dad’s Garage Theatre Company has done.

Dad’s Garage is celebrated for its award-winning improv comedy, its ability to attract big-name comedians to Atlanta, collaborations with the Alliance Theatre and the Atlanta Opera, and performances at the Fox Theatre. In short, they’ve been very successful. But downstairs in their lobby, they have a plaque on the wall which reads in part:

Noah Britton / Aspberger's Are Us

Friday on "City Lights with Lois Reitzes":

Noah Britton / Asperger's Are Us

Having Asperger's Syndrome is not funny, but the comedy troupe Asperger's Are Us is very funny. The quartet of comedians, all of whom are openly autistic, formed in 2010 after meeting at a summer camp and have been touring the country with their unique brand of comedy ever since.

Troupe member Noah Britton describes the syndrome as a "systematic difference" in the way they approach the world. The condition involves hypersensitivity to conflict and change. 

Courtesy of Get Scene Studios And Highwire Comedy Co.

With Georgia’s film boom, acting studios are finding themselves with a much larger clientel and thus a little less space in their classes and their facilities.

Get Scenes Studios has hosted acting classes, castings and tapings for the past few years, and this summer, they moved into a bigger building to fill the growing need. They share the space with Highwire Comedy Co., a longform improv comedy troupe that also host classes for theater, improv and, increasingly, film actors.

Boyd Lewis / Courtesy of the Atlanta History Center

Thursday on "City Lights with Lois Reitzes":

Boyd Lewis / Courtesy of Atlanta History Center

Photographer Boyd Lewis witnessed an Atlanta in flux.

Working for Atlanta’s alternative press in the 1970s, he captured the protests that erupted into the streets, the alternative culture that consumed Midtown and the rise of civil rights leaders who became the city’s new political leaders.

Savannah College of Art and Design

In 1978, then elementary school teacher Paula Wallace decided to open an arts college called the Savannah College of Art and Design.

SCAD is now a university, offering undergraduate and graduate degrees in anything from fibers to animation to writing.

Donald Stampfli / Associated Press

Wednesday on "City Lights with Lois Reitzes":

Bryan Meltz

In his recent op-ed for ArtsATL, Fahamu Pecou wrote that he makes art "as a form of protest, but more so as a form of love."

The artist and scholar is protesting representations of black masculinity in pop culture — think sagging pants, hoodies and gold chains — by transforming those portrayals from caricature into a nuanced narrative, one informed by history, politics, fashion, fine art and more.

Courtesy of ArtsATL

This Cultural Olympiad story was produced in partnership with ArtsATL as part of "Atlanta Remembers: The 1996 Olympics," WABE's series on the impact of the 1996 Summer Olympics on Atlanta, 20 years later. For more stories, click here. To read the whole story on ArtsATL, click here.

Kyra Semien / WABE

Last time best-selling author Joshilyn Jackson joined "City Lights" for “Writer to Reader,” she was up against a deadline for her latest book, “Origin Story,” had asked her publisher for an extension, and was setting out to revise a lot of her book so the end would be “present and surprising and inevitable from word one onwards.”

After using her month-long extension to its fullest, Jackson has finally turned in “Origin Story” and is back to discuss why she was not proud of her initial draft of the book.

Spencer Weiner / Associated Press

This Cultural Olympiad story was produced in partnership with ArtsATL as part of "Atlanta Remembers: The 1996 Olympics," WABE's series on the impact of the 1996 Summer Olympics on Atlanta, 20 years later. For more stories, click here.

Sept. 18, 1990. Maynard Jackson was serving his third term as mayor when, on that September day in Tokyo, the president of the International Olympic Committee announced that Atlanta had won the bid to host the 1996 Summer Olympic Games.

Spencer Weiner / Associated Press

Tuesday on "City Lights with Lois Reitzes":

Jeff Roffman

Monday on "City Lights with Lois Reitzes":

Bear Hebert

A New Orleans-based theater ensemble is exploring this idea in the Atlanta area: there's a difference between what Southern culture is and what we think it is.

The company, NEW NOISE, combines theater, dance and music in their latest production, “Oxblood.” It is second in their trilogy “New Southern Hymnal” exploring Southern identity. This time, they delve into land, labor and home.

Courtesy of the Alliance Theatre

This Cultural Olympiad story was produced in partnership with ArtsATL as part of "Atlanta Remembers: The 1996 Olympics," WABE's series on the impact of the 1996 Summer Olympics on Atlanta, 20 years later. For more stories, click here.

Atlanta playwright Pearl Cleage’s "Blues for an Alabama Sky" has been called a masterpiece and is her most-performed play.

Courtesy of ''Hotel Claremont''

Friday on "City Lights with Lois Reitzes":

Courtesy of Georgia State University

Milestone birthdays, summer entertainment and great movies are intersecting at the corner of Forsyth and Luckie streets in Atlanta. The Rialto Center for the Arts is presenting the Be Downtown Film Festival to celebrate their centenary, their 20 years with Georgia State University and the Atlanta Film Festival's 40th anniversary. 

The festival, which includes screenings of Shaft, Space Jam and Enter The Dragon, has been curated by Rialto Executive Director Leslie Gordon and the Atlanta Film Festival's Executive Director Chris Escobar. 

Charlie McCullers / ArtsATL

This Cultural Olympiad story was produced in partnership with ArtsATL as part of "Atlanta Remembers: The 1996 Olympics," WABE's series on the impact of the 1996 Summer Olympics on Atlanta, 20 years later. For more stories, click here. To read the whole story on ArtsATL, click here.

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