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All Things Considered

Weekdays at 4 p.m. and Weekends at 5 p.m. on WABE's Live Stream; Weekends at 6 p.m. on WABE's News Stream

NPR's flagship evening newsmagazine delivers in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world.

Every weekday, hosts Amy Kiley,Robert Siegel, Audie Cornish, Ari Shapiro and Kelly McEvers present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special – sometimes quirky – features.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

When Ahmed Badr was 8 years old, his family's home in Baghdad was bombed in the midst of the Iraq War. The family was uninjured. They moved to Syria, which was peaceful then, and in 2008, they came to the U.S. as refugees.

Writing helps Badr deal with what he's been through, and he wants to give other young people the same outlet. Now a student at Wesleyan University, Badr founded the website Narratio to empower others to tell their stories.

Singer and multi-instrumentalist Krystle Warren has been compared to artists like Tracy Chapman and Nina Simone. The latter comparison is particularly intriguing: Not only does Warren share that icon's talent for evocative storytelling, but she also lives in France, as Simone once did.

By night, they play gigs. By day, they sample ramen in cities across America.

Oil producers across the country are watching to see what OPEC does at its meeting in Vienna this week, since the cartel of oil-exporting countries has recently played a big role in turning around a two-year U.S. slump.

There are more than twice as many U.S. rigs drilling for oil as a year ago, a turnaround that's felt keenly in places like the Bakken oil patch in North Dakota. Cigarettes and chewing tobacco are flying off the shelves of the gas station Angela Neuman manages in the town of Williston.

There's a rich body of evidence that links chocolate to heart health.

Now comes a new study that finds people who consume small amounts of chocolate each week have a lower risk of developing atrial fibrillation, a heart condition characterized by a rapid or irregular heartbeat.

Seth Wenig / Associated Press

Georgia's university system says campuses won't provide gun storage facilities or signs when a new state law permitting concealed handguns takes effect this summer.

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The guidance released Wednesday also makes clear that people will be able to carry concealed weapons during tailgates.

The law takes effect July 1 and allows people with state-issued permits to carry concealed weapons onto public campuses. Georgia previously banned guns on campuses.

Stephannie Stokes / WABE

Kids in low income neighborhoods tend to change schools more often than their peers. Studies show that can have a detrimental effect on their education.

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This past year in Atlanta, one public school tried to break that trend—by bringing in some lawyers.

At Thomasville Heights Elementary School in southeast Atlanta, Christal Reynolds and Ayanna Jones-Lightsy have just started their day.

This year marks the 200th anniversary of the birth of the man who invented recorded sound — Edouard-Leon Scott de Martinville. He beat the more well-known inventor Thomas Edison by 20 years, though his accomplishments were only recognized over the last decade.

While the uses of recorded sound seem obvious now — music, news, voice messages — none of it was obvious to Scott or Edison when they made the first recordings. It's a story that has some lessons for today's aspiring inventors.

Coolray Field, formerly Gwinnett Stadium, has been home to the Gwinnett Braves since 2009.
Karl Moore

The Triple-A Gwinnett Braves are asking fans to assist in choosing a new team name for the 2018 season. The hope is the change will reduce confusion with the Atlanta Braves, and fill seats at the minor league franchise's games.

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Just this weekend, Gwinnett Braves Manager North Johnson says the team had a promotional table set up at a lacrosse game.

Charles Reed / U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement via AP

Since President Trump's inauguration, federal immigration officials have arrested nearly 2,000 more people in Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina than they did during the same period last year.

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According to numbers released by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), officials arrested 4,246 people from Jan. 20 through April 29 this year. That's compared to to 2,429 arrests during the same time period in 2016 – a nearly 75 percent increase. 

Conceptual rendering by HDR, Inc. courtesy of The Trust for Public Land

Atlanta broke ground Friday on a big new park, just west of downtown. Cook Park, in Vine City, will have statues honoring Civil Rights leaders. It’s also being built to alleviate flooding on the Westside.

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Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed said the park will be a new Atlanta landmark.

President Trump is expected to face pressure from European Union leaders at the G-7 summit in Italy next week to keep the U.S. in the Paris Climate Treaty.

Georgia Gets Ready For Unpredictable Mosquito Season

May 18, 2017
2006 photo from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta shows a female Aedes aegypti mosquito acquiring a blood meal from a human host.
James Gathany / AP/CDC

Fulton County has already started spraying for mosquitoes, but it can be hard to predict how bad the bugs will be.

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Fulton County started its mosquito control program in 2001, when Georgia saw its first case of West Nile virus. Kathleen Toomey, the county's health director, said Fulton has continued the program because of other mosquito-borne diseases, like Zika.

A wooden puzzle in the silhouette of a human head might look fun if the stakes weren't so high.

DeKalb CEO Pushes To Repave Roads With Possible New Tax

May 17, 2017
Alison Guillory / WABE

DeKalb County's CEO is looking to drum up support for a new sales tax.

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If voters approve a one-penny sales tax referendum, DeKalb County CEO Michael Thurmond said it could generate almost half a billion dollars in the next five years. He wants to use a lot of that money to improve roads.

The famous Renaissance painting of the goddess Venus, standing nude on a giant shell, has been appropriated, satirized and riffed on so many times — by everyone from Andy Warhol, to Lady Gaga, to The Simpsons — that it's easy to lose track of its origins.

an employee of Immigration and Customs Enforcement's Stewart Detention Center in Lumpkin, Ga., waiting for the front gate to be opened so she can enter.
Kate Brumback / Associated Press

Authorities say a Panamanian man who died of apparent suicide at an immigration detention center in Southwest Georgia had been in solitary confinement for 19 days.

Federal immigration officials said 27-year-old Jean Jimenez-Joseph was found unresponsive in his cell at the Stewart Detention Center with a sheet around his neck early Monday morning. He was later pronounced dead at a hospital in Americus, according to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Rep. John Lewis Meets Ga. Constituents At Meet-And-Greet

May 16, 2017
Adhiti Bandlamudi / WABE

Nearly 200 people turned out Monday night to meet with Congressman John Lewis.

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The group included Wilhelmina Jenkins, who lives in Atlanta's West End.

"I love that Congressman Lewis is always at town hall meetings, out among the people," Jenkins said. 

Lori Leary, who lives in Decatur, agreed.

On Monday, authorities in Yemen declared a state of emergency due to a sharp rise in cholera deaths.

Yemen has been at war for more than two years — a Saudi-led coalition has been battling Shiite Houthi rebels aligned with Iran — leaving a reported 10,000 dead. The fighting has decimated much of the country's infrastructure, including its medical facilities. The World Health Organization said in April that fewer than half of Yemen's medical centers were functioning to capacity.

U.S. diplomats staged a rare intervention to rescue the family of a human rights lawyer held in China. The attorney was released last week, after having been swept up in a two-year-old crackdown that has put most of the country's rights lawyers and legal activists out of business.

Human rights groups have been watching to see whether the Trump administration will take a more or less muscular approach to human rights in China than their predecessors, and this case highlights some of the issues at stake.

For his first commencement speech as president, Donald Trump went back to a place that was once key to his efforts as a candidate to shore up support among the Republican base.

Standing before tens of thousands of members of the Class of 2017 and their families at Liberty University's open-air stadium in Lynchburg, Va., Trump thanked the crowd for helping him achieve the presidency.

"I wanna thank you because, boy, did you come out and vote — those of you that are old enough; in other words, your parents," Trump said. "Boy, oh boy, you voted. You voted!"

Cooked chicken from birds grown and raised in China soon will be headed to America — in a trade deal that's really about beef.

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross announced Thursday night that the U.S. was greenlighting Chinese chicken imports and getting U.S. beef producers access to China's nearly 1.4 billion consumers. But the deal is raising concerns among critics who point to China's long history of food-safety scandals.

There's been an unprecedented spike in white supremacist activity on campuses across the U.S. since the election and college students and administrators are struggling to figure out how to respond.

Posters at the University of Texas at Arlington last month implored students to "report any and all illegal aliens. America is a white nation." Also last month, at the University of Pennsylvania flyers blared "Imagine a Muslim-free America."

Rolling Stone magazine turns 50 this year, and co-founder Jann Wenner has written the foreword to a new book celebrating the anniversary. Wenner started Rolling Stone in San Francisco in 1967 with $7,500 of borrowed money, donated office space and some used typewriters. He was a 21-year-old Berkeley dropout who was into all the great music coming out in the year of the "Summer of Love" — and he wanted to create a magazine that took rock and roll seriously.

The battle over alcohol stores in tiny Whiteclay, Neb., has been going on for decades. Home to roughly about a dozen people, the town has been called a "rural skid row." Images of Lakota people openly drinking in town or staggering drunk on its streets are commonplace.

But now, that easy access to alcohol is gone.

John Bazemore, File / Associated Press

Friday is a key deadline for Georgia Power. The company worked out a deal to keep construction going on its two new nuclear power units at Plant Vogtle near Augusta. That's as Westinghouse, which is the lead contractor, has begun bankruptcy proceedings. That deal was extended at the end of April, and now expires Friday night.

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David Goldman / Associated Press

Weather permitting, the Interstate 85 bridge could reopen this weekend, nearly a month-and-a-half after it collapsed from a fire. However, that doesn't mean it will be smooth sailing throughout the area near that site.

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The Georgia Department of Transportation is resurfacing roads from the Brookwood Split to Clairmont Road.

Some of that work was started during the bridge construction.

courtesy of the dekalb county sheriff's office

Georgia's governor has appointed a panel to investigate the charges pending against a sheriff accused of exposing himself in an Atlanta park.

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DeKalb County Sheriff Jeffrey Mann was arrested Saturday after a police officer said Mann exposed himself to the officer in Piedmont Park and then ran.

Mann faces charges of indecency and obstruction of an officer. He has said it was a misunderstanding.

David Goldman / Associated Press

There is a light at the end of the tunnel ... regarding the I-85 bridge.

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Gov. Nathan Deal made it official Wednesday: The part of the interstate that  collapsed in a fire in March will reopen Monday, at the latest.

That's about a month ahead of schedule.

Atlanta resident David Rucker says he's not surprised state and local officials made sure fixing the roadway was done as quick as possible.

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