Denis O'Hayer | WABE 90.1 FM

Denis O'Hayer

Host, Morning Edition

Denis O'Hayer, the host of Morning Edition, joined WABE in January, 2009 as host of All Things Considered and Marketplace.  Prior to that, Denis covered local affairs, politics and government for 11 years as a political reporter and public affairs program host for WXIA/11Alive.  In 2015, he was named to the Atlanta Press Club Hall of Fame.  The Georgia Association of Broadcasters selected him as its Broadcaster of the Year in 2014.

Although he has been with WABE since 2009, Denis has a much longer history with Public Broadcasting Atlanta.  He started as a pledge drive volunteer and host at PBA-30 in 1978.  Eventually, he began hosting PBA-30 specials on subjects ranging from the environment to the conflict in the Middle East.  In 1988, he began hosting a new show, The Layman’s Lawyer, a look at how the law affects everyday life.  It ran until 2004.  During that time, he also produced and hosted Atlanta This Week, a reporters’ roundtable, which ran from 1996 to 2001.  In 2012, he and Rose Scott, along with the PBA-30 team, won a regional Edward R. Murrow award for “How to Stop the Candy Shop,” a TV special on the fight against child sex trafficking in Atlanta.

O’Hayer began his career in radio in Connecticut in 1976 at WGCH-AM (Greenwich) followed by WELI-AM (New Haven). In 1978, his career led him to Atlanta where he accepted a position with WGST-AM/FM. O’Hayer worked at the station for more than 19 years in a variety of roles.  He hosted several news and public affairs programs; Counterpoint with Tom Houck and Dick Williams; Cover Your Assets, a consumer-oriented show; Lawn & Garden; The Home Show; and The Law Show.  From 1991 to 1997, O’Hayer hosted Sixty at Six, a daily, one-hour news and interview program. His broadcast career also includes on-air work with CNN’s Southeast Bureau and Georgia Public Broadcasting.

Denis has long been involved in the Atlanta community.  His work includes service on the boards of Families First and the Atlanta Press Club, where he served as President, and continues to work on the Debate Committee.

Denis graduated from Middlebury College in Vermont, with a degree in Spanish.  He and his wife Lisa live in Atlanta.

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As Thursday night turned into Friday morning, the U.S. Senate — by a vote of 51-49 — defeated the “skinny repeal” proposal pushed by Republican leaders as a measure to replace parts of the Affordable Care Act.  

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That left GOP leaders in a familiar position: starting over on a health care bill. 

On Morning Edition, Denis O’Hayer got some thoughts on the dynamics behind the vote — and what’s next— from political strategists Brian Robinson and Tharon Johnson. 

Carolyn Kaster / Associated Press

As Senate Republicans push for a vote this week on repealing and replacing Obamacare — or simply repealing it and leaving the replacement part for later — a group of House Democrats has proposed a plan of their own.

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Richard Drew / Associated Press

Forget the old idea of summer doldrums in Washington.  In fact, forget the idea of a long summer recess.  Georgians were in the middle of a July frenzy in the nation’s capital:  from the continuing Republican effort to replace the Affordable Care Act, to the battle over Donald Trump Jr.’s emails.  That series of messages revealed Trump Jr. had been told a Russian lawyer with whom he had scheduled a meeting was part of a Russian effort to discredit Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton.

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Georgia's largest health insurance company, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Georgia, has started a new rule:  it will deny coverage to individual policyholders for emergency room visits the company deems to be unnecessary.  

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The idea is to address the soaring costs that are racked up when patients go to the ER for problems that should be handled in a doctor's office or a clinic.

Ian Palmer / WABE

Republican Karen Handel's victory in the 6th Congressional District runoff sparked several days of finger-pointing among Democrats who had hoped Jon Ossoff could flip a House seat that had been in GOP hands for decades.

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